This Week’s Reading – Hexagram  53

This Week’s Reading – Hexagram 53

Hexagram 57 is a good reading to explore for all in this fast paced world .  This was a reading with all fixed lines . What does all fixed lines denote? No changing lines or all fixed is the oracle’s way of getting the point across in emphatic fashion.   Ears up, eyes fixed straight ahead, take this in! Wake up! All fixed means the present reading “Now” and the near future are the same hexagram.

Gradual progress is what comes when one is trying to move ahead of the natural pace of lessons learned. The universe spends time with each of us and is patient enough to show us the same lessons until we wise up. Some of us think of ourselves as fast learners. Some of us repeat the same mistakes over and over and over. The I Ching counsels us to takes things slow, get rooted before you reach for the sky. Be like a young sapling growing on the mountainside, your time will come but only after gradual development and many consecutive days of rain, wind and sun.

Remember that all readings from the oracle are like teachings from a very wise Guru or teacher. The readings are a reflection of you.  Whatever you bring to the Oracle is reflected back to you.

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53 — Gradual Progress-53

Wilhelm/Baynes: The wild goose gradually draws near the summit. For three years the woman has no child. In the end nothing can hinder her. Good fortune.

Blofeld: The wild goose moves gradually towards the hillock. In the end, the results will be incomparable — good fortune!

Liu: The wild goose gradually approaches the top of the hill. The woman is not pregnant for three years. In the end, nothing can overcome her. Good fortune. [There will be confusion in the beginning, but understanding later; after overcoming obstacles, things will go smoothly in your life.]

Ritsema/Karcher: The wild-swan Infiltrating tending-towards the mound. The wife, three year’s-time not pregnant. Completing: absolutely-nothing has mastering. Significant.

Shaughnessy: The wild goose advances to the mound: the wife for three years does not get pregnant; in the end nothing overcomes it; auspicious.

Cleary (1): Geese gradually proceed onto a mountain top. The wife does not conceive for three years, but in the end nothing defeats her. Good fortune.

Cleary (2): … After all, no one could overcome her. This is auspicious.

Wu: The wild goose flies in gradually to rest on a hill. The woman has not been pregnant for three years, but she finally overcomes her disadvantages. Auspicious.

COMMENTARY

Confucius/Legge: The subject of the line will get what she desires. Wilhelm/

Baynes: In the end nothing can hinder good fortune. One attains one’s wish. Blofeld: Good fortune in the form of complete fulfillment of our desires. Ritsema/Karcher: Acquiring the place desired indeed. Cleary (2): Getting what was wished for. Wu: She gets what she wishes.

Legge: Line five is a dynamic line in the ruler’s seat, and yet appears here as the symbol of a wife. Somehow she has been at variance with, and kept in disgrace by, calumniating enemies such as the plunderers of line three; but things come right in the end. The wife, childless for three years, becomes at last a mother, and there is good fortune. The wife will have a child; minister and ruler will meet happily.

NOTES AND PARAPHRASES

Siu: Because of the calumny of deceitful people, the man is misjudged while advancing into a high position. Although reconciliation and progress result eventually, nothing is achieved in the interim.

Wing: As you gain an ever greater position of influence, you become more and more a target for attack. Deceitful people may slander you, or you may even be misjudged by those closest to you. Because you are isolated, nothing meaningful can be accomplished. Eventually communications will be established and good fortune will follow.

Editor: The image is of a peak or goal which is somewhat subordinate to the extreme heights of line six. The rewards of this attainment require more time to become consolidated.

On the biological plane the irreconcilable elements of father and mother, of male and female, are reconciled on a new level in the child, who carries in his own person physical characteristics and psychological components derived from both parents. It is not surprising, therefore, that in the images of the unconscious a child frequently appears as the symbol of reconciliation on the psychological plane within the individual.
M.E. Harding — Psychic Energy

A. A delayed issue comes in due time.

B. Protracted labor brings forth an eventual synthesis.

Line-6

Legge: The sixth line, dynamic, shows the geese gradually advanced to the large heights beyond. Their feathers can be used as ornaments. There will be good fortune.

Wilhelm/Baynes: The wild goose gradually draws near the cloud heights. Its feathers can be used for the sacred dance. Good fortune.

Blofeld: The wild goose moves gradually towards the mainland. Its feathers can be used for ritual purposes — good fortune!

Liu: The wild goose gradually approaches the cloudy heights. Its feathers can be used in ritual decoration. Good fortune. [You will carry out a significant undertaking with someone’s help.]

Ritsema/Karcher: The wild-swan Infiltrating tending-towards the highlands. Its feathers permit availing-of activating fundamentals. Significant.

Shaughnessy: The wild goose advances to the land: its feathers can be used to be emblems; auspicious.

Cleary (1): Geese gradually proceed to level ground; their feathers can be used for ceremonies. Good fortune.

Wu: The wild goose flies gradually into the clouds. Its feathers may be used for decorum. Auspicious.

COMMENTARY

Confucius/Legge: The object and character of the subject of the line cannot be disturbed. Wilhelm/Baynes: He is not to be disconcerted. Blofeld: The sentence about the feathers indicates that now disorder cannot prevail. [The traditional Chinese conception of good government, good order within the family and so on, allots an important role to ritual because of its efficacy in making people inclined to regard their duties with solemnity and because it helps to make everything seem orderly.]Ritsema/Karcher: Not permitting disarray indeed. Cleary (2): They cannot be put in disarray. Wu: Don’t mess it up.

Legge: The subject of line six has reached the top of the hexagram. There is no more advance for him, and he has no correlate. He will work for the state and verify the auspice derived from the ornamental plumes of the geese.

NOTES AND PARAPHRASES

Siu: The man reaches the pinnacle, completes his work, and leaves inspiration for the world to follow.

Wing: As you achieve the greatest heights in your upward climb, you become an example for others. You are emulated by those who admire you, and this in itself is the greatest praise. There is good fortune for all concerned.

Editor: Most translations emphasize that the use of the feathers is for ritual or sacred purposes. A feather used in religious ritual suggests spiritual thoughts, concepts, truths, aspirations, ideals, etc. “The large heights beyond” would be the